Category Archives: All News

New Journal (NEJM Evidence) & Upcoming Workshop on Evidence Synthesis

Thomas Jefferson University Libraries just added a new journal to our collection – NEJM Evidence. The journal, published by the New England Journal of Medicine, is an online-only, peer-reviewed general medical journal. NEJM Evidence, published monthly, will highlight original research and new ideas in clinical trial design and clinical decision-making.

And you can gain skills to find more evidence synthesis publications at our workshop, “Evidence Synthesis for Evidence-Based Teaching,” this March. Greg Laynor, Senior Librarian at Scott Memorial Library, will lead the virtual workshop on Friday, March 11, where he’ll share tips to find evidence synthesis publications about teaching practices. The workshop will also cover options for publishing evidence synthesis projects on education topics, such as the Best Evidence Medical Education (BEME) Collaboration.

In the meantime, check out NEJM Evidence. The journal publishes:

  • Original research, clinical trials, and other clinically grounded work (e.g., epidemiology studies, first-in-human trials, meta-analyses) that validate or challenge prior clinical findings
  • Standard reviews, systematic reviews, and other review types that contextualize research findings to accelerate clinical adoption of new evidence
  • Case studies and reviews of clinical trial methodology that enhance understanding of trial strengths and weaknesses
  • Curbside consult series that addresses common patient care issues

Learn more about NEJM Evidence and sign up for the Evidence Synthesis for Evidence-Based Teaching workshop in March.

JDC Quarterly Report October – December 2021: CREATE Day Presentations, Dissertations, Story Slam, Population Health Capstones, and More

Happy New Year and welcome to 2022! The Jefferson Digital Commons (JDC) ended the final quarter with 326 new items and 193,650 downloads. Check out the Quarterly Report to read about the latest additions to the repository and see what people are saying about the JDC.

In 2021, the JDC reported:

  • 828,681 downloads
  • 21,218 video and audio streams
  • 15,311 institutions accessed content
  • 1,564 works posted
  • 218 countries visited the site

This quarterly report includes:

  • Articles
  • Conferences and Symposia
  • CREATE Day Presentations
  • Dissertations
  • Faculty Development Programs
  • Grand Rounds and Lectures
  • JCPH Capstone Presentations
  • Jefferson Health Conference for Advancing Care Excellence
  • Journals and Newsletters
  • Lesson Plans
  • Models
  • Posters
  • Reports
  • Story Slam
  • Student Projects
  • What People are Saying About the Jefferson Digital Commons

Check out the Quarterly Report now to learn more.

SPRING 2022 WORKSHOPS: Time management, measuring research impact, the elevator pitch, and more

Jump into 2022 by prioritizing your professional goals with the Academic Commons! Workshops will focus on things like:

  • updating course materials to be inclusive and accessible to students
  • improving your time management skills to be most productive
  • measuring the impact of your research
  • utilizing educational technologies to make teaching online effective

We’ll cover classroom tools like VoiceThread and Respondus, Open Educational Resources (OER), persuasive writing, and more. Browse the sessions below or download our flyer to learn more.

Claiming Your Identity as a Researcher and Measuring Your Research Impact
Wednesday, February 16, 12-1pm
REGISTER HERE

Learn different ways to frame your research by utilizing resources (ORCID, SciENcv, Google Scholar, and Scopus Author ID) designed to help you measure your impact.

Leveraging Open Educational Resources and Open Pedagogy to Support Students & Promote Educational Equity
Monday, March 7, 12:45-1:45pm
REGISTER HERE

The use of Open Educational Resources (OER) is growing. Learn the reasons behind the increased interest in OER, get tips on how to search for OER, and find out how the library can support you in using OER.

Evidence Synthesis for Evidence-Based Teaching
Friday, March 11, 12-1pm
REGISTER HERE

Learn how to find evidence synthesis publications about teaching practices. Learn options for publishing evidence synthesis projects on education topics, such as Best Evidence Medical Education Collaborative.

Writing Strategies to Get People to Listen and Understand
Wednesday, March 30, 12-1pm
REGISTER HERE

Have you ever been told that your writing is hard to understand? We’ll review simple writing concepts you can use to make your sentences clearer, livelier, and more concise.

The Elevator Pitch
Wednesday, April 13, 1-2pm
REGISTER HERE

What would you say if you had a minute or two to make a case with a decision-maker? What kinds of words might make a difference in getting through to them? We’ll analyze the pitch and practice making one using a simple method and key words.

Winnie-The-Pooh will be just one of many new works entering the Public Domain starting January 1st, 2022

While we all celebrate January 1st as the start of a new year full of new possibilities, there is another reason that fans of open access information in the United States commemorate every January 1st. This is because January 1st is when new works enter the public domain for the year. Despite what it might sound like, the public domain is not a place. Instead, according to the U.S. government copyright office, works that are in the public domain are “no longer under copyright protection” and “may be used freely without the permission of the former copyright owner.” Currently, U.S. copyright law states that materials published between 1923-1977 remain under copyright for 95 years from their publication date. What this means for Winnie-The-Pooh is that now creators will be able to take the beloved characters from that children’s story and write their own stories or create their own media without having to get permission from a copyright holder.

Interested in learning more about what works will be entering the public domain this year? The Public Domain Review website has put together a new feature where they showcase a work set to enter the public domain each day throughout December. Other well-known works highlighted on their website include Ernest Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises and books by authors such as D. H. Lawrence, Baroness Orczy, Franz Kafka, William Faulkner, and Agatha Christie.

This year there is also something special happening with music and sound recordings. All recordings published in the U.S. before 1923 will enter the public domain in January. These works were not available before now because sound recordings before the 1970s were protected by state laws, which held that the words were copyrighted indefinitely. The Music Modernization Act of 2018 made it possible for these works to enter the public domain. Check out these sound recordings on the Library of Congress’s Citizen DJ website, and use them without permission however you like starting on January 1st.

To learn more about copyright and fair use issues, please visit the Thomas Jefferson University Libraries copyright guide.

Designing for Inclusivity: 3 New On-Demand Modules for Instructors

As an instructor, knowing where to start and what to do to ensure your content is accessible to all learners can be overwhelming. The Academic Commons has tools, trainings, and support to assist you in this process.

We recently created three on-demand modules to provide an introduction to universal design and accessibility tools.

Check out these modules to get started:


An Introduction to Universal Design for Learning

A Guided Tour of Ally
Resources to Improve Accessibility

Designing your content for inclusivity is critical to meeting the learning needs of 21st-century learners. Learners are becoming more and more diverse across learning environments. Traditional learners enter with higher expectations about customization and access, while the non-traditional student population is ever-expanding and may struggle to fit learning into busy professional and personal lives.

Gaining a better understanding of usability, accessibility and Universal Design for Learning encourages faculty to reduce barriers to access while encouraging persistence through the creation of adaptive content.

Tools such as Ally are available within Canvas to assist with these goals. There are also many other resources available that can help to increase the accessibility of documents across various apps. Some minor adjustments in the creation process can have major impacts on increasing accessibility for learners.

The following courses offer an opportunity to dive into these topics and more.

An Introduction to Universal Design for Learning
The goals for this lesson include:

A Guided Tour of Ally
The goals for this lesson include:

  • demonstrate the use of Ally in Canvas
  • document methods of interacting with accessibility score indicators, the instructor feedback panel and the course accessibility report
  • identify the best use cases for alternative formats

    Complete A Guided Tour of Ally

Resources to Improve Accessibility
The goals for this lesson include:

  • identify techniques available to increase accessibility in Microsoft 365 and Adobe Acrobat documents
  • explain the rationale for alternative text for images
  • summarize major guidelines for drafting alternate text 

    Complete Resources to Improve Accessibility


Register now: Clinical Research Fundamentals Conference (Dec 6 -9)

Join the Jefferson Clinical Research Institute for the Clinical Research Fundamentals Conference. This remote conference, presented by Subject Matter Experts, will provide foundational knowledge directly applicable to the performance of clinical research.

The remote conference will take place Monday, December 6 – Thursday, December 9, from 9 – 11:30 am. Learn more and register via the myJeffHub Jefferson Enterprise Clinical Research Community or email valerie.hess@jefferson.edu.

Attendance is free to Jefferson Enterprise employees and CE credits will be awarded.

PHMC Suspends the Household Health Survey

Due to funding constraints, the Public Health Management Corporation (PHMC) has put plans for the next iterations of the Household Health Survey (HHS) on hold indefinitely. PHMC has been proud to provide these valuable data to the region for over two decades and continues to explore funding opportunities to provide this valuable resource moving forward. For questions, please contact phmcresearch@phmc.org.

Results of past surveys and other Community Health Database Products (CHDB) from 2000-2018, remain available.

NEW ON-DEMAND WORKSHOP SERIES: Information Literacy Starter Pack (4 videos)

As Jefferson faculty, researchers, and staff, we know that you are busy. That’s why we recently created four (and more to come!) video recordings so that you can enjoy the Academic Commons and Thomas Jefferson University Libraries workshops at a convenient time.

These four videos make up a workshop series called Information Literacy Starter Pack, which highlights databases and resources to assist in your clinical and teaching practice. Resources discussed in the video series include ClinicalKey, DynaMed, Draw it to Know it, Statista, JoVE, and more.

Click a workshop title below to watch the videos or scroll down to read workshop descriptions and learning objectives.

Information Literacy Starter Pack: Clinical:
Evidence Based Practice (ClinicalKey)


Information Literacy Starter Pack: Clinical:
Evidence Based Practice (DynaMed)


Information Literacy Starter Pack: Sciences:
New Databases to Enhance Your Curriculum (Draw it to Know it, Statista)

Information Literacy Starter Pack
We Have a Video for That



Clinical: Evidence Based Practice (ClinicalKey)
The tools of evidence-based medicine are continually evolving. It is vital for those working with patients and in the healthcare field to keep up to date on how to interact with the current evidence-based tools.  One of the newest resources to Jefferson Health is ClinicalKey, which provides an array of literature, tools, and resources.

After completing the session, participants will be able to:

  • Search and access information in ClinicalKey for Nursing
  • Understand what resources are available
  • Successfully create a personal account in the platform

Watch Workshop Recording

Clinical: Evidence Based Practice (DynaMed)
The tools of evidence-based medicine are continually evolving. It is vital for those working with patients and in the healthcare field to keep up to date on how to interact with the current evidence-based tools.  One of the newest resources to Jefferson Health is DynaMed, a point of care resource. DynaMed is implemented within the EHR system EPIC at Jefferson Health and has a mobile app available. 

After completing the session, participants will be able to:

  • Search and access information in DynaMed
  • Understand what resources are available
  • Successfully create a personal account in the platform

Watch Workshop Recording

Sciences: New Databases to Enhance Your Curriculum (Draw it to Know it, Statista)
Are you frustrated with curriculum planning or looking for new ways to get students engaged in learning? Want to know more about what resources are available to you at Jefferson? This portion of our series will take you on a detailed tour of the Draw It to Know It and Statista resources. Draw it to Know it: Medical & Biological Sciences is a multimodal database for interacting with biological science materials with illustrated and narrated tutorials. Statista is a resource with data on over 80,000 topics from over 18,000 sources onto a single professional platform that you can use for a variety of subjects.

After completing this session, participants will be able to:

  • Access and utilize Draw it to know it and Statista resources
  • Effectively implement these resources into their course instruction
  • Inform others about these resources

Watch Workshop Recording

We Have a Video for That
Did you know that there are a variety of resources that can help enhance your curriculum? Found easily on our library database menu are all the resources needed to help your students learn in a variety of ways. Let’s take a deeper dive into how FA Davis and JoVE can make a difference in your courses.

FA Davis is a comprehensive resource with searchable texts and in-depth multimedia materials that covers a variety of topics from athletic injuries to rehabilitation techniques. JoVE is a scientific and peer-reviewed journal with publications in video format.

At the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  • Access and utilize FA Davis and JoVE resources
  • Effectively implement these resources into their course instruction
  • Inform others about these resources

Watch Workshop Recording

Check out our other workshops, including live sessions on professional writing, instructional design and educational technologies, and open educational resources.

LabArchives Research Edition Virtual User Group and Bootcamp: October 25 – 29

LabArchives will be holding their popular Virtual User Group for researchers on Monday, October 25, 2 PM ET. Ask questions and hear from researchers at other institutions on how they use the electronic research notebook.

During LabArchives Research Edition Bootcamp, pick and choose from several topics offered multiple times to learn how you can organize your research, control access to your data, and get Notebook fit in one week!

Learn more and register for the Bootcamp Training Sessions and the Virtual User Group Event.

Can’t make it? Regularly scheduled trainings and recordings of past sessions are available. Would you like to present at a future user group event? Contact LAsupport@jefferson.edu.

Jefferson Digital Commons (JDC) Quarterly Report: July – September 2021 Now Available

Another quarter has passed, which means it is time to look back at what we accomplished this summer. Check out the latest quarterly report to view the work of your colleagues.

Over the last three months the JDC had:

  • 330 works posted
  • 247,436 downloads
  • 4,808 streams
  • 197 countries visit the site
  • 6,628 institutions access content

This quarterly report includes:

  • Articles
  • Data Sets
  • Dissertations
  • Grand Rounds and Lectures
  • JCPH Capstone Presentations
  • Jefferson Research Newsletter
  • Journals and Newsletters
  • Posters
  • What People are Saying About the Jefferson Digital Commons

Check out the quarterly report now!

Point Papers from the 1930s-1970s join Gutman’s Textile Industry Historical Collection

New collection alert! Check out the new additions to the Gutman Library’s Textile Industry Historical Collection – the Point Papers. The Point Papers collection includes over 1,000 swatches of hand-drawn, hand-painted point papers, croquis, and design repeats from the 1930s-1970s. The materials were donated by the Northampton Textile Company, a textile manufacturer once located in Mount Holly, New Jersey.  

“Point papers” refer to a type of design painted by textile designers on graph paper or hand-drawn grids and translated into woven fabric by textile manufacturers before the advent of computer assisted design. The items fall into the two main categories of “point papers” (on graph paper) and design croquis (painted sketches), and all have been executed by hand, often with penciled-in notes about weave patterns, pattern repeats, or other instructions.  Learn more about point papers and Edna Leonhardt, one of the designers featured in the collection, on the Follow the Thread blog.

Browse the collection to view the point papers and, when available, learn information about a point paper’s creation date (estimates), designer’s name, and a brief description. We encourage you to check back often as we’ll continue to upload more point papers in the future.

Jefferson Humanities Forum: A Conversation with Yaa Gyasi on October 12

Join Jefferson Humanities on Tuesday, October 12, for a special event with author Yaa Gyasi:

Jefferson Humanities Forum “Origins” presents Yaa Gyasi 
Tuesday, October 12, 7-8 p.m., via Zoom
Register at yaa-gyasi.eventbrite.com  

Yaa Gyasi is the author of Homegoing, one of the most celebrated debuts of 2016. A riveting, kaleidoscopic novel, Homegoing is a story of race, history, ancestry, love, and time that traces the descendants of two sisters torn apart in eighteenth-century Africa across three hundred years in Ghana and America. Her follow-up novel, Transcendent Kingdom, is a raw and intimate novel about a Ghanaian family in Alabama that layers themes of loss, mental illness, and representation in STEM fields––challenging our notions of who or what a scientist is, and how they might look or think. Born in Ghana and raised in Huntsville, Alabama, Gyasi is a graduate of the Iowa Writer’s Workshop and lives in Berkeley, California. She is the winner of the National Book Critics Circle John Leonard Prize, the PEN/Hemingway Award for Best First Novel, and was a finalist for the Dayton Literary Peace Prize for Fiction and the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize. 

Check out this flyer to learn more.

Visit the Jefferson Libraries to access a copy of Yaa Gyasi’s books:

This event is free and open to the public. The event is co-presented with the Philadelphia University Honors Institute at Thomas Jefferson University. 

October eBooks: 25 new titles on the climate crisis and environmental health, labor and delivery nursing, MRI pathology, and more

Happy October! This month we added 25 eBooks to our electronic collection and the new additions span a range of topics, including climate change and the impact of the environment on social justice, midwifery and nursing care, public health administration, and more.

Browse the additions below or check out our complete eBook collection online here (Gutman/East Falls) and here (Scott/Center City).

100 Questions & Answers About Coronaviruses

Advanced Practice Nursing: Essential Knowledge for the Profession

Crowley’s an Introduction to Human Disease: Pathology and Pathophysiology

CT and MRI Pathology

Designing Babies: How Technology is Changing the Ways We Create Children

Equipment for Respiratory Care

The Future We Choose: Surviving the Climate Crisis

Health Insurance and Managed Care: What They Are and How They Work

Health Program Planning and Evaluation: A Practical, Systematic Approach for Community Health

Health Sciences Literature Review Made Easy: The Matrix Method

Labor and Delivery Nursing: A Guide to Evidence-Based Practice

Maxwell’s Understanding Environmental Health: How We Live in the World

Moral Tribes: Emotion, Reason and the Gap Between Us and Them

Nerve: Adventures in the Science of Fear

Novick & Morrow’s Public Health Administration: Principles for Population-Based Management

Nursing Diagnosis Manual: Planning, Individualizing, and Documenting Client Care

Pathophysiology: A Practical Approach

Philosophy and Occupational Therapy: Informing Education, Research, and Practice

Physical Intelligence: The Science of How the Body and the Mind Guide Each Other Through Life

Professional Ethics in Athletic Training: Practicing and Leading with Integrity

Top 100 Drugs in Midwifery and Women’s Health

The Undocumented Americans

Unsustainable Inequalities: Social Justice and the Environment

Waste: One Woman’s Fight Against America’s Dirty Secret

Where is the Mango Princess?

FALL BOOK CLUB: Learn how to bring your scholarship to the masses as we read “The Engaged Scholar” Thursdays this fall

“Society and democracy are ever threatened by the fall of fact. Rigorous analysis of facts, the hard boundary between truth and opinion, and fidelity to reputable sources of factual information are all in alarming decline.”

 – Andrew Hoffman, The Engaged Scholar: Expanding the Impact of Academic Research in Today’s World, 2021

How do we fix this and bring your scholarship to the masses?

Join Daniel Verbit of the Academic Commons and Gutman Library and Chris Pastore of the Center for Faculty Development and Nexus Learning as we continue our scholarly reading group. This fall, we’ll be reading and discussing The Engaged Scholar: Expanding the Impact of Academic Research in Today’s World (Andrew Hoffman, Stanford University Press, 2021) on Thursdays from 1:30-2:15 p.m. via Zoom. Each week, starting October 7, we will discuss a chapter and how to be a more engaged scholar. The book club will run consecutively until Thursday, November 18.

Taking the lead from the book, we will discuss ways to bring your area of research outside the silos of your discipline. Other topics will focus on the limitations of the academic reward system and the scholarly uses of social media. We anticipate book club discussions will facilitate critical self-reflection and promote professional vitality.

All are welcome to join, but limited slots will be available to facilitate small group discussions. After capacity is reached, the sessions will be locked, so please register in advance by emailing Daniel.Verbit@jefferson.edu to save your spot. If you are committed to attending, we will have a limited number of copies of the book available to pick up in East Falls in October. Participants may also purchase a copy on their own from any bookseller.