Scott Memorial Library

Information For

Teaching & Learning

    Building a Better Lecture
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 9/20/2017
    Time: 5:30pm – 6:30pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A, Center City Campus
    (Register for this workshop)

    According to classroom observations and self-report data, instructors rely heavily on lecture as an instructional method despite research documenting the limited effectiveness of lectures as a teaching strategy. Lectures can be integral to the learning experience with an understanding of the factors contributing to its effectiveness as an instructional tool. This workshop will focus on identifying key uses of lecture and three simple strategies for building more effective learning experiences for students. Participants are asked to identify and bring a lecture they have previously developed for use during the experiential workshop.

    Upon completion of the workshop, participants will be to:
    • Identify best uses of lecture
    • Define one organizing technique for lectures
    • Incorporate signposts into a planned lecture experience
    • Apply best practices to a planned lecture experience


    Communicate Like a Pro--Think Like a Contractor:Build a Solid Framework
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 9/21/2017
    Time: 9:00am – 10:00am
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A, Center City Campus
    (Register for this workshop)

    Created as a series, but designed as discrete workshops, this eight part series focuses improving communication and presentation skills. Each workshop will focus on a finite skill required for effective communication. Each workshop begins with a mini-lecture on a specific communication or public speaking skill and then guides participants through a series of activities designed to highlight the skill while also providing strategies for later use.

    These sessions are interactive and experiential. The only way to confront the fear of public speaking or to improve communication skills is to practice. These workshops provide opportunities for practice and attempt to alleviate anxiety around public speaking though the process of desensitization and laughter.

    Participants are invited to attend all of the sessions or select the workshop(s) of most interest in need.

    Communicate Like a Pro--Think Like a Contractor:Build a Solid Framework

    Contractors value a solid foundation and a building’s bone. Think about the importance of a load-bearing wall and the care with which it is treated it renovation projects.

    Similarly, presentations must have a foundation upon which to build and a discernible structural pattern that supports the author’s position. This workshop focuses on common organizational patterns and the importance of making that pattern discernible for audiences. Participants will be asked to identify commonly used organizational methods and practice using internal previews and reviews as well as signposts in speeches.

    Upon completion of this workshop, participants should be able to:
    • Describe at least two methods of structuring a presentation or message
    • Identify a the importance of signposts
    • Create a message with a discernible organizational pattern



    Facilitating Discussions 101
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 9/25/2017
    Time: 5:30pm – 6:30pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A, Center City Campus
    (Register for this workshop)

    Teaching through discussion rather than lecture presents unique set of opportunities and challenges for instructors. This workshop explores the power of discussion as a teaching tool and offers advice on strategies for incorporating discussion into in small, medium or large course environments.

    This experiential workshop will assist instructors in setting expectations for student preparation and involvement, developing a strategy for initiating conversations, and skills for sustaining and advancing a discussion. Participants will practice developing questions that launch productive discussions, effectives responses for probing responses and a sampling of discussion techniques for small or large groups.

    At the end of the session, participants should be able to:
    • Identify two ways to initiative a discussion in class
    • Describe key characteristics of good discussion questions
    • Explain two techniques for engaging learners in discussion

    Not Another Test! Beyond High Stakes Testing
    Date: 9/26/2017
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:30pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 307, Center City Campus
    (Register for this workshop)

    This session will demonstrate how no-stakes assessment used in class or as a low-stakes assignment can facilitate student self-regulation, retention of information and inform your instruction in real time. Many of us wonder just how much our students know or have retained from our lectures or the assigned work that is often necessary to understand the new information you are about to teach. We will explore some simple evidence-based teaching and student engagement strategies that will help you understand what you need to do differently in an upcoming class session and right on the spot as you are teaching. This can be particularly helpful in large classes but is also a valuable technique in any learning environment. A sampling of technologies will be discussed for this purpose including Nearpod, VoiceThread and Collaborate Ultra.

    At the end of the session, participants should be able to:
    • Understand the purposes of and differences between formative and summative assessments
    • Describe multiple formative assessment options for use in their courses
    • Create at least one formative assessment for immediate use in one or more courses


    The Active Learning Lecture
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 9/28/2017
    Time: 11:00am – 12:00pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A, Center City Campus
    (Register for this workshop)

    The large lecture presents a number of challenges to experienced and novice instructors alike. This workshop explores some of the challenges (and assumptions we make about what can or cannot happen in a large lecture) and describes a number of techniques to assist faculty transition from the “sage on the stage” to a “guide on the side.”

    This interactive workshop will:
    • describe benefits and challenges associated with a traditional lecture model
    • explore instructor and student assumptions about large enrollment courses
    • identify potential engaged learning activities for the large lecture courses
    • demonstrate a handful of techniques to enhance large lecture courses


    Communicate Like a Pro---Think Like a Radio Host: Find Your Voice
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 10/5/2017
    Time: 9:00am – 10:00am
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A, Center City Campus
    (Register for this workshop)

    Created as a series, but designed as discrete workshops, this eight part series focuses improving communication and presentation skills. Each workshop will focus on a finite skill required for effective communication. Each workshop begins with a mini-lecture on a specific communication or public speaking skill and then guides participants through a series of activities designed to highlight the skill while also providing strategies for later use.

    These sessions are interactive and experiential. The only way to confront the fear of public speaking or to improve communication skills is to practice. These workshops provide opportunities for practice and attempt to alleviate anxiety around public speaking though the process of desensitization and laughter.

    Participants are invited to attend all of the sessions or select the workshop(s) of most interest in need.

    Communicate Like a Pro: Think Like a Radio Host: Find Your Voice

    Fans of WKRP in Cincinnati and News Radio probably had a favorite personality from the fictionalized radio stations. For me, it was Les Nesman (“Oh, the humanity.”) and Bill McNeal (played by Phil Hartmann). Each of the radio hosts capitalized on their voice to delivery news, information and “gripping” music (a la Dr. Jonny Fever) to the listeners. As presenters, we must cultivate a signature style that addresses the speaker’s authenticity and vocal capabilities. This workshop encourages participants to reflect on the signature’s authentic speaking style they would like to cultivate experiment with simple techniques to add more energy, variety and interest to their voice.

    Upon completion of this workshop, participants should be able to:
    • Describe the concepts of a “signature” style
    • Identify the importance of vocal variety in communication settings
    • Apply at last two techniques to improve vocal variety


    Feedback for Improved Learning & Performance
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 10/10/2017
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 307, Center City Campus
    (Register for this workshop)

    Feedback is an invaluable tool for learners to improve their skills and abilities. This workshop explores the importance of both formal and informal feedback in the learning environment. Participants will explore different means for sharing feedback with learners, key characteristics of effective feedback. Through a series of hands-on exercises and case vignettes, attendees will apply the characteristics of effective feedback to a variety of scenarios, including student written work, class discussions and poor exam performance.

    At the end of the session, participants should be able to:
    • Articulate the role of feedback to improve learning and performance
    • Describe the difference between informal and formal feedback
    • Apply principles of effective feedback


    Communicate Like a Pro--Think Like a Mime: Use Nonverbal Communication
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 10/19/2017
    Time: 9:00am – 10:00am
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A, Center City Campus
    (Register for this workshop)

    Created as a series, but designed as discrete workshops, this eight part series focuses improving communication and presentation skills. Each workshop will focus on a finite skill required for effective communication. Each workshop begins with a mini-lecture on a specific communication or public speaking skill and then guides participants through a series of activities designed to highlight the skill while also providing strategies for later use.

    These sessions are interactive and experiential. The only way to confront the fear of public speaking or to improve communication skills is to practice. These workshops provide opportunities for practice and attempt to alleviate anxiety around public speaking though the process of desensitization and laughter.

    Participants are invited to attend all of the sessions or select the workshop(s) of most interest in need.

    Communicate Like a Pro: Think Like a Mime: Use Nonverbal Communication

    Mimes tell stories without making a sound. Mimes know how to use their bodies and their facial expressions to convey emotion and advance a story. Effective public speakers do not need the skill or expertise of a mime to harness their bodies potential for communicating ideas. Speakers simply need to be aware of nonverbal communication, its potential to impact the audience perception and practice at using the body to convey a message. This workshop focuses on key elements of nonverbal communication, such as eye contact, stance, hand gestures and facial expression to deliver more effective messages with more. Participants should prepare for an introductory round of charades!

    Upon completion of this workshop, participants should be able to:
    • Discuss the importance of nonverbal communication
    • Describe two primary components of nonverbal communication
    • Apply at last two techniques to improve nonverbal communication

    A Look at Online and Hybrid/Blended Course (Re-)Design and the Student Experience
    Instructor: Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 10/24/2017
    Time: 1:00pm – 2:00pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 307, Center City Campus
    (Register for this workshop)

    Not all courses are created equal. This session will focus on course design in online and blended/hybrid courses and the impact it has on the student experience. Evidence-based practices will be shared with participants and examples of different, yet effective, course designs. The presentation will showcase at least one before and after example of a course re-design that will be shared by the presenter and a course instructor.

    At the end of the session, participants should be able to:
    • Explain how course design can negatively and positively impact the student experience in online and hybrid/blended courses
    • Identify two – three features of various course designs presented that they would consider incorporating in a current or future online or hybrid/blended course


    Communicate Like a Pro--Think Like an Advertiser: Grab and Keep Attention & Close the Deal
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 11/2/2017
    Time: 9:00am – 10:00am
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A, Center City Campus
    (Register for this workshop)

    Created as a series, but designed as discrete workshops, this eight part series focuses improving communication and presentation skills. Each workshop will focus on a finite skill required for effective communication. Each workshop begins with a mini-lecture on a specific communication or public speaking skill and then guides participants through a series of activities designed to highlight the skill while also providing strategies for later use.

    These sessions are interactive and experiential. The only way to confront the fear of public speaking or to improve communication skills is to practice. These workshops provide opportunities for practice and attempt to alleviate anxiety around public speaking though the process of desensitization and laughter.

    Participants are invited to attend all of the sessions or select the workshop(s) of most interest in need.

    Communicate Like a Pro--Think Think an Advertiser: Grab and Keep Attention & Close the Deal

    Some estimates suggest that we are exposed to thousands of advertisements in a day. In order to compete, an advertisement must grab the viewer’s attention and convince people to act in some way. Similarly, speakers must capture and maintain the audience’s attention and more importantly move people to action, even if the action is to seek additional information or to inspire behavioral change. This workshop focuses on the importance of keeping and maintaining and audience’s attention, specifically as it applies to introductory and concluding remarks. Participants will explore several techniques to grab the audience’s attention, create relevancy, and issue the call to action.

    Upon completion of this workshop, participants should be able to:
    • Articulate the importance of introductory remarks in a communicative exchange
    • Articulate the importance of concluding remarks in a communicative exchange
    • Apply at last two techniques to grab and maintain the audience’s attention


    Teaching and Learning Online: A Dive into the Unknown
    Instructor: Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 11/7/2017
    Time: 1:00pm – 2:30pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 307, Center City Campus
    (Register for this workshop)

    This session will take a dive into the uniqueness of the fully online learning environment and what that means for instructors and students. Current research, evidence-based practices and tips and tricks will be shared with participants. In this session we will review, in part, the role of online course structure, communication and engagement in student satisfaction and success. Please join us if you are thinking about moving a course online at some point, are currently teaching online or simply want to learn more about online teaching and learning.

    At the end of the session, participants should be able to:
    • Describe the current evidence-based research on online teaching and student satisfaction
    • Describe and conceptualize one or more strategies in their current or future online teaching practices


    Electronic Portfolios for Academic Programs and Career Success
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 11/7/2017
    Time: 5:30pm – 6:30pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A, Center City Campus
    (Register for this workshop)

    The fields of art, architecture and engineering have long used portfolio’s as a way for both students – and professionals – to show case their work. Not unexpectedly, these physical portfolios have found their way onto the digital world and are often called e-portfolios. Whether physical or electronic this tool for show casing a person’s skills and experience is valuable. Both to the learner as evidence of their accomplishments and as a tool to help them stand out as a better candidate in the hiring process. Portfolios can also play an important role in the professional development of a student. Specific course projects that meet academic objectives can be reflected on, solidifying the students understanding of concepts and the skills they’ve mastered.

    Upon completion of this workshop, participants will be able to:
    • Identify how portfolios can be used in the academic program to track student progress and mastery of skills
    • Observe a demonstration of sample portfolios in Jefferson’s portfolio product, Portfolium
    • Identify which assignments in your course would be appropriate for showcasing student achievement in a portfolio


    Engaging Students and Facilitating Interaction Using VoiceThread
    Instructor: Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 11/14/2017
    Time: 10:00am – 11:00pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 307, Center City Campus
    (Register for this workshop)

    VoiceThread is a multimedia tool for learner engagement and interaction across learning environments. The technology makes it easy to record and annotate slides, encourage asynchronous discussion and track student participation. Join us in this session to learn more and hear about faculty experiences with VT in across learning environments.

    At the end of this session, participants should be able to:
    • Understand the use of VT as one of many active learning strategies
    • Describe possibilities for incorporating VT to increase student engagement and interaction, present content and assess students
    • Plan one or more VT activities for use in a course.


    Communicate Like a Pro--Think Like an Athlete: Harness the Power of Practice
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 11/16/2017
    Time: 9:00am – 10:00am
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A, Center City Campus
    (Register for this workshop)

    Created as a series, but designed as discrete workshops, this eight part series focuses improving communication and presentation skills. Each workshop will focus on a finite skill required for effective communication. Each workshop begins with a mini-lecture on a specific communication or public speaking skill and then guides participants through a series of activities designed to highlight the skill while also providing strategies for later use.

    These sessions are interactive and experiential. The only way to confront the fear of public speaking or to improve communication skills is to practice. These workshops provide opportunities for practice and attempt to alleviate anxiety around public speaking though the process of desensitization and laughter.

    Participants are invited to attend all of the sessions or select the workshop(s) of most interest in need.
    Communicate Like a Pro--Think Like an Athlete: Harness the Power of Practice

    Serious runners (not just professionals) incorporate a number of strategies to achieve their personal bests, including short runs, long runs, internal training, strength conditioning and nutrition. Practice for public presentations should adopt a similar strategy and the workshops included in this series offer drills to improve specific aspects of one’s communication skills. This workshop focuses on putting the pieces together and offers a perspective on practice that highlights the importance of speaking aids, “chunking” and ‘distributed practice.”

    Upon completion of this workshop, participants should be able to:
    • Describe the importance of practice in creating effective presentations
    • Define different methods of preparation
    • Apply at last two techniques to facilitate effective practice for a public presentation

    Creating & Maintaining a Sense of Community in Fully Online Learning Environments
    Instructor: Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 11/28/2017
    Time: 1:00pm – 2:00pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A, Center City Campus
    (Register for this workshop)

    This session will focus on communication and community building in fully online learning environments. The perceived lack of student-student and student-instructor interactions remains a fear for instructors and students new to online teaching and learning. In this session, participants will learn some tips and tricks for creating and maintaining communication and building a sense of community in their courses. The Community of Inquiry (CoI) Framework will be discussed as one method for understanding the value of Social Presence in this learning environment. Additionally, participants will hear from an instructor who made modifications to a course that proved beneficial for all.

    At the end of the session, participants should be able to:
    • Describe the perceived challenges of online courses and personal interactions
    • Describe methods for developing and fostering a sense of community and connection in a fully online course
    • Identify some readily available tools and strategies for facilitating student-student and student-instructor interactions in their current courses


    Communicate Like a Pro--Think Like a Designer: Create an Impact with Visuals
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 11/30/2017
    Time: 9:00am – 10:00am
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A, Center City Campus
    (Register for this workshop)

    Created as a series, but designed as discrete workshops, this eight part series focuses improving communication and presentation skills. Each workshop will focus on a finite skill required for effective communication. Each workshop begins with a mini-lecture on a specific communication or public speaking skill and then guides participants through a series of activities designed to highlight the skill while also providing strategies for later use.

    These sessions are interactive and experiential. The only way to confront the fear of public speaking or to improve communication skills is to practice. These workshops provide opportunities for practice and attempt to alleviate anxiety around public speaking though the process of desensitization and laughter.

    Participants are invited to attend all of the sessions or select the workshop(s) of most interest in need.

    Communicate Like a Pro--Think Like a Designer: Create an Impact with Visuals

    Visuals matter. Designers understand the importance of aesthetics and how to use visual elements to set a tone or elicit a response. Communicators could benefit from borrowing a few design principles to improve the now ubiquitous PowerPoint (PPT) presentation, This workshop focuses on a handful of design principles that will elevate the look and feel of PPT presentations to make the message pop. Participants will apply the highlighted design principles to a selection of PPT slides to evaluate the good, bad, ugly and possible fixes.

    Upon completion of this workshop, participants should be able to:
    • Discuss the importance of visually appealing materials that complement a presentation
    • Identify key design considerations in preparing visual materials
    • Identify common errors in PPT design

    Communicate Like a Pro--Think Like a Race Car Driver: Respond on the Fly (to Q& A)
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 12/7/2017
    Time: 9:00am – 10:00am
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A, Center City Campus
    (Register for this workshop)

    Created as a series, but designed as discrete workshops, this eight part series focuses improving communication and presentation skills. Each workshop will focus on a finite skill required for effective communication. Each workshop begins with a mini-lecture on a specific communication or public speaking skill and then guides participants through a series of activities designed to highlight the skill while also providing strategies for later use.

    These sessions are interactive and experiential. The only way to confront the fear of public speaking or to improve communication skills is to practice. These workshops provide opportunities for practice and attempt to alleviate anxiety around public speaking though the process of desensitization and laughter.

    Participants are invited to attend all of the sessions or select the workshop(s) of most interest in need.


    Communicate Like a Pro--Think Like a Race Car Driver: Respond on the Fly (to Q& A)

    A casual observer of a FormulaOne or NASCAR event has witnessed decision-making that takes place in milliseconds and can change the outcome of the race. Professional drivers must plan for and be prepared to act in the face of the “unknown” as it unfolds. Similarly, good communicators plan and prepare for the “unknown” of a Q&A session. Speakers can anticipate and prepare for likely questions in advance by carefully analyzing points of disagreement or contention or through consideration of the audience and its key concerns. This workshop focuses on the dreaded Q&A session and provides tips and techniques for successfully navigating the final minutes of a communication experience.

    Upon completion of this workshop, participants should be able to:
    1. Discuss the role and function of a Q&A session in professional settings
    2. Develop a plan for facilitating an effective Q&A session
    3. Apply at least two techniques for responding to the Q&A session

    Reflection as a Tool for Teaching and Learning
    Instructor: Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 12/12/2017
    Time: 10:00am – 11:00am
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A, Cemter City Campus
    (Register for this workshop)

    This session will focus on the use of student reflection as one method for deepening their understanding of course content (Mezirow, 1997). "Critical reflection is the means by which we work through beliefs and assumptions, assessing their validity in the light of new experiences or knowledge, considering their sources, and examining underlying premises" (Cranton, 2002, p. 65). Strategies for reflective practice will be discussed and will include the use of a private journal (communication between instructor and student only), Wiki, reflective written assignments and other related activities. Join the discussion and learn how to incorporative this valuable evidence-based practice in one or more of your courses to benefit your students and gain a better understanding of their thought processes.

    At the end of the session, participants should be able to:
    • Discuss the value of student reflection as a potential strategy for facilitating deeper learning
    • Develop a tentative plan for incorporating reflective activities for one or more courses
    • Select one tool for consideration for one or more reflective assignments


    Introducing iCE (Interactive Curricula Experience) to Your Course
    Instructor: (TBD) CTL Staff
    Date: 12/14/2017
    Time: 10:00am – 11:30am
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 307, Center City Campus
    (Register for this workshop)

    The Center for Teaching & Learning presents iCE: interactive Curricula Experience Platform & App. A web-based platform and iPad app, iCE delivers faculty-generated content directly to students’ iPads, laptops or desktops for a connected learning experience.

    Making use of shared resources, the iCE Builder allows faculty to package multiple learning Objects for direct distribution to students' devices. The iCE App's display helps students and faculty connect learning Objects to topics and Topics to Modules. These course building blocks (Objects, Topics and Modules), and the iCE search engine, also assist learners to make connections.

    This new learning initiative makes collaboration and active learning much more accessible to the Jefferson community and may help inspire different approaches to teaching and learning across the university. Faculty wishing to learn more or to adopt this interactive technology for storing, sharing and organizing instructional content must attend one of the iCE workshops.The workshop introduces the iCE Builder interface and student app, so faculty may begin building a course in iCE.
    In this workshop, participants will:

    1) Develop content beginning with Objects (images, video, and other course artifacts)
    2) Organize Objects into Topics
    3) Create Modules for courses using both self-developed content and shared content
    4) Learn the steps to incorporate iCE into your course


    Using Multiple Methods for Teaching and Engaging & Assessing Students
    Instructors: Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD; Jennifer Fogerty, MSEd
    Date: 1/10/2018
    Time: 1:00pm – 2:00pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A, Center City Campus
    (Register for this workshop)

    This session consists of an overview of evidence-based practices for presenting content, engaging students with the content and assessing student learning using a variety of methods and materials (with and without technology). Most of these practices can be utilized in any learning environment, but we will first consider the goals and objectives for the course or task when determining the ‘best fit’. Participants will be asked to bring a copy of a current syllabus for use in the session discussions and for conceptualizing changes in their course.

    At the end of the session, participants should be able to:
    • Describe the rationale for using multiple methods of presentation, engagement and assessment in their teaching
    • Describe at least one learning goal for their course
    • Identify one alternate presentation, engagement activity and assessment method to meet the learning goal


    Active Teaching, Engaging Minds
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 1/17/2018
    Time: 9:00am – 10:30pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A, Center City Campus
    (Register for this workshop)

    Active teaching is an umbrella term used to identify a variety of teaching strategies. It includes most anything that students do in a classroom other than passively listening to an instructor’s lecture. Research demonstrates active learning improves students' understanding and retention of information and can be very effective in developing higher order cognitive skills such as problem solving and critical thinking. Active learning, however, presents challenges and requires re-thinking the classroom space and traditional roles.

    This interactive workshop will:
    • summarize the impact of active teaching on student learning
    • demonstrate a handful of active teaching strategies
    • discuss some challenges to adopting active teaching techniques


    Teaching and Supporting International Students and Other ESL Learners
    Instructor: James Dyksen, MSEd-TESOL
    Date: 1/25/2018
    Time: 11:00am – 12:30pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A, Center City Campus
    (Register for this workshop)

    International students and other students for whom English is a second language face a unique set of challenges and issues as they adjust to study in the degree programs at Jefferson, and, in many cases, to living in the US for the first time. This workshop will elicit faculty experiences teaching and working with ESL learners, including both concerns and effective strategies. The workshop is designed to develop awareness of the needs of international students and other ESL learners in Jefferson programs and classes, to discuss teaching, curriculum design and communication strategies that may help such students, and to identify resources across campus that may aid International and ESL learners with coursework and / or other areas of need.

    At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
    • Describe the unique needs of international students and other ESL learners
    • Develop strategies for addressing the needs or concerns of international students and other ESL learners
    • Apply these alternative strategies to the learning environment
    • Identify available campus resources to support international students and other ESL learners


    Creating a Learner-Centered Environment
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 1/29/2018
    Time: 10:00am – 11:00am
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A, Center City Campus
    (Register for this workshop)

    The educator’s role is undergoing a change in the 21st century. This transformation is, due in part to the information explosion, educational technologies, calls for accountability and demonstrations of student learning, and a growing body of evidence-based practices that document effective pedagogy. As a result, the instructional paradigm is giving way to the leaner-centered paradigm.

    Workshop participants will explore the paradigm shift and how the different approaches impact the way we approach the classroom in several key dimensions. Using short vignettes to illustrate the different dimensions, participants will be asked to imagine how adoption of a learner-centered dimension changes their approach to the classroom.

    At the end of the session, participants should be able to:
    • Summarize developments that allowed for growth of learner-centered paradigm
    • Identify key differences between the instructional and the learner-centered paradigms
    • Classify course practices and policies as more/less student-centered.


    Creating & Maintaining a Sense of Community in Fully Online Learning Environments
    Instructor: Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 2/6/2018
    Time: 1:00pm – 2:00pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A, Center City Campus
    (Register for this workshop)

    This session will focus on communication and community building in fully online learning environments. The perceived lack of student-student and student-instructor interactions remains a fear for instructors and students new to online teaching and learning. In this session, participants will learn some tips and tricks for creating and maintaining communication and building a sense of community in their courses. The Community of Inquiry (CoI) Framework will be discussed as one method for understanding the value of Social Presence in this learning environment. Additionally, participants will hear from an instructor who made modifications to a course that proved beneficial for all.

    At the end of the session, participants should be able to:
    • Describe the perceived challenges of online courses and personal interactions
    • Describe methods for developing and fostering a sense of community and connection in a fully online course
    • Identify some readily available tools and strategies for facilitating student-student and student-instructor interactions in their current courses


    Creating and Preparing Charts for Publication
    Instructor: Kathleen Day, MS
    Date: 2/13/2018
    Time: 10:00am – 11:00am
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 307, Center City Campus
    (Register for this workshop)

    Creating charts for publication is a snap with Microsoft Excel. The graphing and formatting of Excel make it a quick and easy solution for many types of data display. We’ll look at optimizing your format in Excel for easy placement into PowerPoint, Adobe Illustrator or Photoshop. Participants should already possess the skills to work with data in Excel.

    At the end of this session, participants should be able to:

    1) Create various types of graphs including: bar charts, x-y plots, scatter plots
    2) Manipulate formatting to gain adequate resolution
    3) Add a chart to MS PowerPoint for automatic updating
    4) Copy and manipulate a chart in Photoshop that satisfies publishers’ requirements

    Photoshop Basics for Teaching and Publication
    Instructor: Kathleen Day, MS
    Date: 3/6/2018
    Time: 10:00am – 11:30am
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 307, Center City Campus
    (Register for this workshop)

    This workshop will focus on the steps involved with manipulating digital images for teaching and publishing. Participants will be shown each step of the process—from digitizing images to managing files for all possible output types. Due to the limited number of site licenses for this program, participants will do hands-on work in small groups.

    At the end of this session, participants should be able to:

    1) Identify the differences in image requirement for print and display
    2) Use the settings for adjusting image resolution
    3) Learn to crop and resize images
    4) Manipulate color including modes and saturation
    5) Apply labels to images
    6) Save images in different file formats

    Facilitating Discussions 101
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 3/8/2018
    Time: 3:00pm – 4:00pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 200A, Center City Campus
    (Register for this workshop)

    Teaching through discussion rather than lecture presents unique set of opportunities and challenges for instructors. This workshop explores the power of discussion as a teaching tool and offers advice on strategies for incorporating discussion into in small, medium or large course environments.

    This experiential workshop will assist instructors in setting expectations for student preparation and involvement, developing a strategy for initiating conversations, and skills for sustaining and advancing a discussion. Participants will practice developing questions that launch productive discussions, effectives responses for probing responses and a sampling of discussion techniques for small or large groups.

    At the end of the session, participants should be able to:
    • Identify two ways to initiative a discussion in class
    • Describe key characteristics of good discussion questions
    • Explain two techniques for engaging learners in discussion

    Intermediate Photoshop
    Date: 3/13/2018
    Time: 10:00am – 11:30am
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 307, Center City Campus
    (Register for this workshop)

    This workshop is a continuation of Photoshop Basics offering a more in-depth exploration of this application’s functions. Topics will include: Automate functions, History Palette, Layers, layout and preparing images for use in MS Office applications. Due to the limited number of site licenses for this program, participants will do hands-on work in small groups. It is highly advised that Participants have an understanding of Photoshop or have attended the Photoshop Basics workshop to attend this workshop.

    At the end of this session, participants should be able to:

    1) Use Automate functions to:
    a) Batch rename image files
    b) Create contact sheets
    c) Record and use Actions for repetitive tasks
    2) Use the History palette to undo selective changes
    3) Inserting guides and grids for layout
    4) Utilize layers

    Teaching for Different Environments
    Date: 4/8/2018
    Time: 11:00am – 12:00pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 306, Center City Campus
    (Register for this workshop)

    This session consists of an overview of the differences in teaching and learning across the three learning environments – Traditional/Face-to-Face, Blended/Hybrid and Fully Online. Knowledge is power – join us in exploring the unique differences between learning environments that include teaching and student learning challenges and evidence-based effective practices.

    At the end of the session, participants should be able to:
    • Describe the differences in teaching challenges between the three different learning environments
    • Describe the differences in the student learning experience challenges between the three different learning environments
    • Provide examples of evidence-based strategies for effective teaching in each of the learning environments
    • Explain how the strategies discussed during the session can improve the student learning experience


    Teaching and Learning Online: A Dive into the Unknown
    Instructor: Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 4/18/2018
    Time: 1:00pm – 2:30pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 307, Center City Campus
    (Register for this workshop)

    This session will take a dive into the uniqueness of the fully online learning environment and what that means for instructors and students. Current research, evidence-based practices and tips and tricks will be shared with participants. In this session we will review, in part, the role of online course structure, communication and engagement in student satisfaction and success. Please join us if you are thinking about moving a course online at some point, are currently teaching online or simply want to learn more about online teaching and learning.

    At the end of the session, participants should be able to:
    • Describe the current evidence-based research on online teaching and student satisfaction
    • Describe and conceptualize one or more strategies in their current or future online teaching practices


    A Look at Online and Hybrid/Blended Course (Re-)Design and the Student Experience
    Instructor: Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 5/1/2018
    Time: 1:00pm – 2:00pm
    Location: Scott Memorial Library, Room 307, Center City Campus
    (Register for this workshop)

    Not all courses are created equal. This session will focus on course design in online and blended/hybrid courses and the impact it has on the student experience. Evidence-based practices will be shared with participants and examples of different, yet effective, course designs. The presentation will showcase at least one before and after example of a course re-design that will be shared by the presenter and a course instructor.

    At the end of the session, participants should be able to:
    • Explain how course design can negatively and positively impact the student experience in online and hybrid/blended courses
    • Identify two – three features of various course designs presented that they would consider incorporating in a current or future online or hybrid/blended course