EndNote 20 for Mac Now Available

EndNote 20 for Mac was just released, and so far it has been successfully tested with MacOS Catalina and Big Sur.

EndNote 20 has a new interface design that is more intuitive for users to operate. In addition to the interface update, EndNote 20 has focused on making it easier to read and annotate PDFs and the search functionality has been improved to help users find references with ease, both from within their reference library and from online databases, such as PubMed. Finally, EndNote has made the deduplication of references easier by allowing users to search by DOI and PMCID during the deduplication process.

Visit our library guide for detailed installation instructions, including how to obtain a product key that you will need to gain access to the new version of EndNote. Instructional materials and information about how to access help with EndNote are also available.

eLife Switches to a New Peer Review & Publication Model

Launched by a small group of biomedical research organizations and charities, the journal eLife began in 2012 to improve the traditional biomedical publishing landscape by creating a faster and more efficient online publishing model, where information could be made openly accessible to researchers and the public. 

Last week eLife announced that it was taking a new step in its ongoing quest to improve the peer review and publishing process by becoming the first journals to commit to reviewing only preprint publications. 

Starting in July of 2021, the journal will begin to only accept manuscripts for review that have been posted to a preprint server before submission. Going further, because the manuscripts they review will be openly accessible as preprints, peer reviews will be made public, even for those declined by the journal. To give everyone time to adjust to this new model, eLife will offer submitting authors the option to opt-out of submitting preprints for the next six months. After that, if a submitted paper has not been posted to a preprint server at the time of submission, the journal will post it to bioRxiv or medRxiv on behalf of the authors. 

This change is especially timely as an increasing number of preprints have been published in the biomedical literature during the pandemic. According to the journal’s chief editor, Michael Eisen, COVID has “highlighted the power of preprints to speed and democratize access to the latest science….but it al–=so highlights the need for an organized system to provide feedback and scrutiny of author-published manuscripts.” In recent years, many researchers and research advocacy groups, such as ASAPbio, have been calling for more experimentation and participation by journals in open peer review models to increase both the rigor and the transparency of science scholarship. 

In an editorial published on eLife, Eisen noted that he is excited by the opportunity to begin to “replace the traditional ‘review, then publish’ model developed in the age of the printing press with a ‘publish, then review’ model optimized for the age of the internet.” 

For more information about eLife’s publishing philosophy, and for details on how this new model will operate, read Eisen’s editorial. 

Winter 2020 Popular Reading List

The holidays will look a little different this year. Whether you’re Zooming with family and friends, celebrating with a smaller group, or just boycotting the whole thing (we wouldn’t blame you), there is one tradition we can all keep — curling up on the couch with a good book. And, what better time than now to escape into a faraway world in your mind with a great book?  

Listed below are some of our popular reading eBooks. We hope you enjoy these books this holiday season, no matter how you plan to celebrate.

Check out the SML’s full popular reading collection.
Check out the Gutman Library’s full popular reading collection.

Graphic Novels

7 Generations: A Plain Cree Saga

Jim Henson’s Labyrinth 2016 30th Anniversary Special

Jim Henson’s The Power of the Dark Crystal Vol. 1

Kindred: A Graphic Novel Adaptation

Showtime at the Apollo: The Epic Tale of Harlem’s Legendary Theatre

Short Reads

The Book of Endings

A Christmas Carol

Fantastic Short Stories by Women Authors from Spain and Latin America

Haunted Holidays

Scientific Romance: An International Anthology of Pioneering Science Fiction

Classic Literature

The Age of Innocence

Anna Karenina

Jane Eyre

Les Misérables

Pride and Prejudice

Fiction

The Enchanted Clock

Improvement

La Bastarda

The Lake on Fire

Pretty Things

Still in Love  

Subtraction

Though I Get Home

Training School for Negro Girls

The White Girl

A YEAR IN REVIEW: Academic Commons Annual Report 2019-2020

Celebrating our 125th anniversary. Announcing a name change. Managing an enterprise-wide technology transition with significant implications for teaching and learning practices. Adapting to the COVID-19 pandemic and shifting to supporting Jefferson students, faculty, clinicians, and staff in an online environment.

Academic Year 2019-2020 was a year unlike any other for the Academic Commons. In this year’s Annual Report, we highlight our major accomplishments and milestones. Enjoy photos from our events and exhibits and read testimonials from students, faculty, and staff who we supported.

Check out the Academic Commons 2019-2020 Annual Report website or download the PDF version.

It’s December and You Know What That Means: 25 New eBooks to Enjoy!

Congrats, you’ve almost made it through 2020! To help you get through the last month of the longest year of all time, we’re sharing 25 new eBooks we just added to our digital shelves.

Topics include negotiation and business tips, safety checklists for health care workers, stroke management, PTSD in teens, and more. Check out the new titles below or browse our complete collection.

It’s About Damn Time: How to Turn Being Underestimated into Your Greatest Advantage

Ask for More: 10 Questions to Negotiate Anything

The Biomedical Writer: What You Need to Succeed in Academic Medicine

Capitalism at Risk, Updated and Expanded: How Business Can Lead

The Chiffon Trenches: A Memoir

Edge: Turning Adversity into Advantage

The Functional Areas of Business

Give Yourself a Nudge: Helping Smart People Make Smarter Personal and Business Decisions

The Goodness Paradox: The Strange Relationship Between Virtue and Violence in Human Evolution

 Hamric and Hanson’s Advanced Practice Nursing: An Integrative Approach

Health Care Worker Safety Checklists: Protecting Those Who Serve

The Innovation Stack: Building an Unbeatable Business One Crazy Idea at a Time

Ischemic Stroke Management: Medical, Interventional and Surgical Management

Joint Commission Big Book of Checklists for Infection Prevention and Control

Principles of Global Supply Chain Management

Project Management in Health and Community Services: Getting Good Ideas to Work

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Coping with Trauma Information for Teens: Health Tips About the Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment of PTSD

Reading Graphic Design in Cultural Context

Refuge Beyond Reach: How Rich Democracies Repel Asylum Seekers

Snooze: The Lost Art of Sleep

Supreme Models: Iconic Black Women Who Revolutionized Fashion  

Type Matters: The Rhetoricity of Letter Forms  

Typographic Knitting: From Pixel to Pattern

The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming

Wildpreneurs: A Practical Guide to Pursuing Your Passion as a Business

WINTER WORKSHOPS FOR FACULTY & RESEARCHERS: Online Teaching Tools, Science Communication & Writing, Technology Skills

Join us for virtual workshops in December on a range of topics including educational technology tools, writing and publication support, and more.

Canvas Basics
Thursday, January 7
8 – 9:30 a.m.
Register Here

Participants will review access to Canvas for faculty and students, its layout and organization, your dashboard, and introduce key course-building features. We will discuss five critical elements or actions to take in your Canvas course.

Active Learning: Building Your Toolkit
Monday, January 11
12 – 1:30 p.m.
Register Here

Active learning has been identified as a method of learning whereby student retention of material is much greater in comparison to the traditional lecture format. This session will introduce the faculty member to the definition of active learning, the benefits of active learning and examples of active learning with attention given to the utilization of technology in its facilitation.

Grading in Canvas 2.0
Tuesday, January 12
11 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Register Here

In this hands-on workshop, you will explore Jefferson’s new learning management system—Canvas.

Participants will explore the various assessment tools available—from creating assignments, deploying tests and quizzes, and building rubrics. Please bring digital copies of a quiz or short test and rubric you currently use and start building in Canvas during the workshop! 

Editing Recorded Lectures
Wednesday, January 13
10 – 11 a.m.
Register Here

 In this workshop, we’ll provide instruction on how to edit your recorded lectures by using two simple and readily available video editing programs. We will go over using Imovie (Mac only) and Adobe Rush (Free to install with Adobe Creative Cloud).

Social Presence in the Online Classroom
Thursday, January 14
2 – 3 p.m.
Register Here

Emotions are inextricably linked to learning and cognition, with relationships between educators and learners at the center of that experience. This workshop will review best practices in establishing and maintaining meaningful interactions between learners and faculty. Together, let’s “reach through the screen” and connect with learners!

VoiceThread: Engaging Students and Facilitating Interaction
Friday, January 15
12 – 1 p.m.
Register Here

VoiceThread is a multimedia conversation tool for enhancing student engagement and online presence. With VoiceThread, instructors and/or students can create, share, and comment on images, Microsoft PowerPoint presentations, videos, audio files, documents, and PDFs, using a microphone, webcam, text, phone, and audio-file upload.

Winter Writing Retreat
Friday, January 29
9 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Register Here

Join us this winter at our monthly half-day writing retreats, devoted solely to your writing projects. Most importantly, you’ll get quiet time to write. We’ll also have a writing consultant and librarian available to answer writing and research questions, help you find materials, talk over your journal choice, edit your work, or just read what you have so far.

Winter Writing Retreat
Friday, February 26
9 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Register Here

Join us this winter at our monthly half-day writing retreats, devoted solely to your writing projects. Most importantly, you’ll get quiet time to write. We’ll also have a writing consultant and librarian available to answer writing and research questions, help you find materials, talk over your journal choice, edit your work, or just read what you have so far.

REGISTER NOW FOR FALL WORKSHOPS: Teaching Online, Tech Tools, Writing for Publication, and More

Regardless of what your classroom and office look like this fall, the Academic Commons is here to help you (and your students) succeed. Join us for virtual workshops on a range of topics including educational technology tools, writing retreats, faculty book clubs, and more.

How to Write More: Habits of Effective Writers
Monday, December 7
12 – 1 p.m.

Few of us ever learn how to write with consistency and fluency, yet being able to do so can mean the difference between being a highly regarded researcher and one who is overlooked. Studies have shown that successful writers practice specific habits that help them flourish and make the process of writing less mysterious. This workshop will focus on these habits and provide practical advice for fostering them in your own writing.

VoiceThread: Engaging Students and Facilitating Interaction
Thursday, December 10
10 – 11 a.m.

VoiceThread is a multimedia conversation tool for enhancing student engagement and online presence. With VoiceThread, instructors and/or students can create, share, and comment on images, Microsoft PowerPoint presentations, videos, audio files, documents, and PDFs, using microphone, webcam, text, phone, and audio-file upload.

Editing Recorded Lectures
Friday, December 11
1 – 2 p.m.

The purpose of this workshop is to provide instruction on how to edit your recorded lectures by using two simple and readily available video editing programs. We will go over using Imovie (Mac only) and Adobe Rush (Free to install with Adobe Creative Cloud). In this workshop, we will go over the basics, such as trimming, cutting, adjusting audio, and combining multiple videos into one.

Social Presence in the Classroom
Tuesday, December 15
11 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Emotions are inextricably linked to learning and cognition, with relationships between educators and learners at the center of that experience. This workshop will review best practices in establishing and maintaining meaningful interactions between learners and faculty. Together, let’s “reach through the screen” and connect with learners!

Science Storytelling
Wednesday, December 16
12 -1 p.m.

The elevator pitch! The purpose of this workshop is to introduce scientists to the idea that storytelling matters if they want to get resources and support for their science. Elements of a “good story” can apply to scholarly writing, and scholarly evidence demonstrates that certain elements of narrative writing increase citation frequency.

Active Learning: Building Your Toolkit
Thursday, December 17
11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Active learning has been identified as a method of learning whereby student retention of material is much greater in comparison to the traditional lecture format. This session will introduce the faculty member to the definition of active learning, the benefits of active learning, and examples of active learning with attention given to the utilization of technology in its facilitation. Attendees will be encouraged to share their experiences (both positive and challenges) related to active learning.

Fall Writing Retreat
Friday, December 18
9 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Join us for our monthly half-day writing retreats, devoted solely to your writing projects. You’ll get quiet time to write, and we’ll have a writing consultant and librarian available to answer writing and research questions, help you find materials, talk over your journal choice, edit your work, or just read what you have so far.

You can join us for all or part of the retreat each month, as your schedule allows.

Canvas Basics
Thursday, January 7
8 – 9:30 a.m.

Participants will review access to Canvas for faculty and students, its layout and organization, your dashboard, and introduce key course-building features. We will discuss five critical elements or actions to take in your Canvas course.

Scopus Introduces Preprints into its Author Profiles

Scopus now includes preprints posted since 2017 in its author profiles. At present, it includes preprints from arXiv, bioRxiv, and ChemRxiv. They plan to add SSRN and medRxiv by early 2021. 

Scopus states that it is making this change because it views preprints as an important part of the research lifecycle, one that allows other scholars to “identify potential collaboration partners” who are “performing cutting edge” research. The addition of preprints will also help provide a more “comprehensive” overview of a researcher’s portfolio as it allows them to share the early stages of their scholarship. 

Scopus is careful to note they will not use preprints for any impact metric calculations.  The final published version will be included in metric calculations, and it will be listed in the author profile as a separate document from its earlier preprint. They are currently evaluating the possibility of linking preprints to their published versions. 

Please note that preprints are not included in the Scopus document search. This addition is just occurring in the Scopus author profiles. 

More about Author Profiles: Every author of a paper published in Scopus has an author profile automatically created. You can view your author profile, or the profile of other researchers, by using their limited, freely accessible author profile search, or by using the author search in Scopus via Scott Library or Scopus via Gutman Library. While authors may request edits to their profile using the Scopus Author Feedback Wizard, preprints cannot be corrected using that tool. Authors can, however, contact the Scopus Support Center with questions or feedback. 

Learn more about Scopus’s decision to add preprints to its author profiles in their support center. 

For more general information on preprints, including a definition and description of the role of preprints in the scholarly communications lifecycle, please visit: 

November is American Diabetes Month: Check Out These 4 Resources on the Topic

November is American Diabetes Month, and we’re honoring that by highlighting four resources that cover diabetes self-management, patient care, and exercise. Check out these eBooks and videos:

App Use and Patient Empowerment in Diabetes Self-Management: Advancing Theory-Guided mHealth Research

Diabetes and Exercise [Video]

Diabetes in Pregnancy: The Complete Guide to Management

Diabetes Management: A Manual for Patient-Centred Care

EndNote update makes popular citation management system more user friendly!

Clarivate has released a new version of EndNote for Windows. The new version, called EndNote 20 is an update to the X9 version that has been in use for the past several years. A Mac version will be released later this year. (Editor’s note: it’s now available.)

The primary goal of the update was to create a new interface design that would be more intuitive for users to operate. In making changes to their interface, EndNote modernized the look and feel of the tool and reorganized many of the menus. They have also worked to improve and simplify their reference editing interface.

While these changes do mean that experienced users will need to take a bit of time to get used to the new system, as many commonly used buttons and menu options have been relocated, overall, the interface has the potential to be a substantial improvement to the product.

EndNote X9 Interface
EndNote 20 Interface

In addition to the interface update, EndNote 20 has also focused on making it easier to read and annotate PDFs and they have improved the search functionality to help users find references with more ease, both from within their reference library and from online databases, such as PubMed. Finally, EndNote has made deduplication of references easier by allowing users to search by DOI and PMCID during the deduplication process.

Upgrading from EndNote X9 to EndNote 20

If you’re in the middle of a paper or project, consider waiting to upgrade until you have time to learn the new version.

Before upgrading to EndNote 20, make sure to save a backup copy of your reference library. You can do this by opening EndNote X9, clicking on “File” on the top left menu, and then choosing the option to create a Compressed Library.

It is not required to delete the older version to install EndNote 20. You can have both versions on the same computer. However, once you have decided to use the new version, uninstalling the old one is recommended.

Visit our library guide for more detailed installation instructions, including how to obtain a product key that you will need to gain access to the new version of EndNote. Instructional materials and information about how to access help with EndNote are also available.

COVID-19 UPDATE: Gutman Library Building is Open!

The Gutman Library building will reopen on Wednesday, January 20. Visit our website for building hours.

Chat with a Librarian
Consultations can be scheduled and held as online meetings via Zoom. Request a library consultation using the Request a Consultation form.

For quick questions, contact us using the library’s Live Chat, available on our homepage, or email us at AskGutman@jefferson.edu.

Remote Access to Resources
You can access Gutman’s databases, e-Books, research guides, mobile applications, and more from our website.  Learn more about remote access here.

Interlibrary Loan
Our Interlibrary Loan services are slightly limited at this time, but if you order a book or article, we will try our best to fulfill your request.

Book & Book Chapter Requests: If we are able to locate an electronic copy of the requested book, we will deliver it to you electronically (via ILLiad). If we are unable to locate an electronic copy of the book, we will not be able to mail you a physical copy at this time.

Journal Article Requests: If we are able to access the requested article from another library, we will deliver it to you electronically (via iLLiad).

Email illGutman@jefferson.edu with any questions regarding Interlibrary Loan.

For the most up-to-date information about the library’s services and resources, visit our website and follow us on Twitter. If you have any questions, contact us at AskGutman@jefferson.edu.

SML COVID-19 Update: Building Open 8 am – 10 pm daily, services available remotely

last updated: Monday, January 18, 2021

The Scott Memorial Library building will be open daily 8 am – 10 pm. Visit our website for service desk hours.

Chat with a Librarian
Virtual librarian consultations can be scheduled and held online via Zoom. Request a consultation.

For quick questions, contact us via Live Chat on our homepage or email us at AskaLibrarian@jefferson.edu.

Remote Access to Resources
Access digital resources like databases, e-Books, and journals from our website. Check out our step-by-step guide, which walks you through the options for accessing full-text journal articles and e-books remotely.

InterLibrary LoanRequests
Our InterLibrary Loan services are limited at this time, but if you order a book or article, we will try our best to fulfill your requests.

Book & Book Chapter Requests: If we are able to locate an electronic copy of the requested book, we will deliver it to you electronically (via ILLiad). If we are unable to locate an electronic copy of the book, we will not be able to mail you a physical copy at this time.

Journal Article Requests: If we are able to access the requested article from another library, we will deliver it to you electronically (via iLLIad).

Email ill@jefferson.edu with questions.

Returning Materials & Due Dates
Once the library reopens, you can return any borrowed materials without penalty. Email us at SML-CIRC@jefferson.edu with questions about returning materials.

For the most up-to-date information about the library’s services and resources, visit our website and follow us on Twitter. If you have any questions, contact us at AskaLibrarian@jefferson.edu.


LabArchives Education Boot Camp – Build, Organize, and Manage Your Course in LabArchives

LabArchives will host a week-long boot camp for instructors, TAs, and course coordinators preparing Spring courses.

Please view the schedule below and register now. Each session will be capped at 100 attendees.

Introduction to LabArchives Education Edition – For Instructors, TAs, and Course Coordinators
For instructors, TAs, and course coordinators that would like an overview of how to create a course notebook, invite students, and grade assignments using LabArchives. Join this session to learn about our best practices and tips to make your Spring Course a success!

Duration: 60-minutes

November 17, 4:00 p.m. EST

November 18, 11:00 a.m. EST

LabArchives Education Edition – Setting up your Course Notebook or Lab Manual
For instructors and course coordinators that would like extra guidance on setting up their course notebooks, organizing materials, and using content from Lab Builder – our multidisciplinary, open source library of course content that contains access to hundreds of online labs, protocols, course packs, and even textbooks!

Duration: 60-minutes

November 17, 10:00 a.m.

November 18, 4:00 p.m.

LabArchives Education Edition for TAs and Grading Staff – Navigating Student Notebooks and Grading Assignments
For Teaching Assistants, graduate students, and all grading staff that would like to review how they can access, navigate, and grade content in LabArchives student notebooks without breaking a sweat!

Duration: 45-minutes

November 18, 1:00 p.m. EST

Request a different time

Using the Canvas, Blackboard, or Moodle LTI Integration in your LabArchives Course Notebook
Join this session to learn how to set up your course through an LTI integration partner, interact with student notebooks, and grade assignments.

Duration: 60-minutes

November 17, 1:00 p.m. EST

Request a different time

Can’t make any of the boot camp sessions but you want to learn more about the LabArchives Education Edition? 

Science Communication Event: How to Write an Abstract (November 12)

Research writers: Join us on Thursday, November 12, for “How to Write An Abstract,” an online workshop where you’ll learn how to create the perfect scientific abstract.

What do you look for when you are researching abstracts? What barriers prevent you from finding what you need? Have you scratched your head wondering what journal editors look for in an abstract?

How to Write an Abstract
Thursday, November 12
1:30 – 2:30 p.m. via Zoom
Register here

The purpose of this workshop is to offer research writers a tool and process for writing abstracts that make it easier for readers to find your published work and for editors to say yes. This course focuses on unpacking the elements that define a well-crafted abstract and helping you write one. 

Participants will:

  • Explain why abstracts are important
  • Define what makes abstracts helpful
  • Examine journal and conference guidelines
  • Use simple tools to design better abstracts

Facilitators

Nikita Nikita, MD, Postdoctoral Fellow at SKCC
Pamela Walter, MFA, Writer at the Office for Professional Writing, Publishing, and Communication

For the 3-point deliverable after the workshop, you can submit an abstract summarizing your own work or an assigned research paper and get feedback from reviewers.

Attendance will grant you 1 point toward the Science Communication Certificate. Completing the abstract will grant you 3 additional points. Submitting an assignment late will grant you 2 points instead of 3. 

See this flyer for more details on this workshop and learn more about the Science Communications Series Certificate program here.

PubMed Clinical Queries: A new look and new filters to find COVID-19 articles!

Clinical Queries helps sift the clinical studies out of the plethora of scholarly literature in PubMed. And now it has an updated look!

Have you ever tried to find a clinical study in PubMed and been overwhelmed by all the results? Maybe you were seeing a lot of animal studies? Or too many review articles and topic summaries? PubMed Clinical Queries will get you straight to the clinical research. After typing your topic into the search box, choose from one of five clinical study categories: Therapy, Clinical Prediction Guides, Diagnosis, Etiology, and Prognosis. Each option gets at a different aspect of your clinical topic.

With this update, NLM has also added a new option for finding COVID-19 articles in eight categories including Transmission, Mechanism, Treatment, Prevention, etc. If you are looking for COVID-19 research, this is a great place to start! (See our COVID-19 guide for other COVID scholarly literature collections)

For more information, see the update in the NLM Technical Bulletin.

If you have used the Clinical Queries tool to look up Systematic Reviews in the past, you can now find the Systematic Reviews under Article Types in the PubMed results Filters. Find the list of Medical Genetics filters in the PubMed Users Guide.

Here is a step-by-step visual of how to use the new PubMed Clinical Queries: