Archived Programs

Curriculum for Leadership and Development

Research

  • Philanthropy 101 - Elizabeth Dale, Executive Vice President for Institutional Advancement

Leadership

Education


From Theory to Practice: Team Science and Collaboration

Instructor: L. Michelle Bennett, PhD; Howard Gadlin, PhD
Date: Thursday, December 12, 2013
Length: 3 hours

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Objectives for this session:

  1. The importance of trust and how to establish it
  2. Establishing a team (or what to do if you have inherited one)
  3. Creating and sharing the scientific vision
  4. Strategies for setting expectations
  5. Managing conflict while promoting the productive disagreement
  6. Strategies for sustaining a successful research team

Developing Great Courses and Lectures: It All Starts with the Objectives!

Instructor: Juan Leon, PhD
Date: Friday, October 4, 2013
Length: 1 hour

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Objectives for this session:

  1. Identify and formulate effective objectives for courses and lectures, including their scaffolding in terms of Bloom's Taxonomy
  2. Articulate the importance of objectives for successful student learning, including their relationship to overall course/lecture design, instructional methodologies, assignments, and assessment
  3. Use proper objectives as the key to sound syllabus construction

Examination Construction and Item Writing

Instructor: Steven Herrine, MD
Date: Friday, October 4, 2013
Length: 1 hour

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Objectives for this session:

  1. Develop a basic understanding of test construction item writing
  2. Critique test items relative to program content
  3. Incorporate general principles of item writing in constructing examinations for their respective student groups

Fundamentals of Effective Feedback and Remediation

Instructor: Karen Glaser; Katherine Berg, MD; Karen Novielli, MD; Ronald Hall, MD
Date: Friday, October 4, 2013
Length: 1 hour

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Objectives for this session:

  1. Understand the difference between feedback and evaluation
  2. Describe the principles of effective feedback
  3. Learn to identify the factors in performance that describe the deficient health professions student
  4. Learn about remediation plans that have been shown to be effectives
  5. Understand the local processes for referral, intervention and remediation of the poorly performing student
  6. Identify appropriate and specific language for documentation of performance concerns and remediation plans

More Effective Teaching through Knowing your Learner

Instructor: Elena Umland, PharmD; Peter Ronner, PhD; John C. Lewis, EdD
Date: Friday, October 4, 2013
Length: 1 hour

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Objectives for this session:

  1. Compare and contrast the different types of learners
  2. Be able to describe today's learner
  3. Be able to identify approaches to teaching that best match today's primary learning styles

Teaching Strategies: From the Bedside to the Desktop

Instructor: John C. Lewis, EdD; Gregary Marhefka, MD
Date: Friday, October 4, 2013
Length: 1 hour

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Objectives for this session:

  1. Define the concept of "strategy" as applied to instructional techniques
  2. Identify key points in strategy development
  3. Recognize a model of strategy choice based upon both learning objectives and teaching settings
  4. Identify significant differences among clinical, in-class, blended and online learning experiences

Cultural Diversity Workshop

Instructor: Denice Cora-Bramble, MD, MBA*
Date: Tuesday, June 12, 2012
Length: 3 hours

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Objectives for this session:

  1. Participants will learn the importance of clinical applications of culturally competent care
  2. Minority Faculty Development including lessons from the field and emerging resilience research
  3. Cultural Competence in a Train-the-Trainer Workshop

Becoming a More Productive Writer

Instructor: Susan R. Johnson, MD*
Date: Friday, March 30, 2012
Length: 1 hour & 40 minutes

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Objectives for this session:

  1. Participants will learn the importance of the elements of an infrastructure to support writing
  2. Understand the theoretical concept "write to think," and how to apply to your own writing
  3. Understand the method of writing in regular, brief sessions
  4. Develop strategies for breaking writer's block

Academic Medicine and Industry: Managing Conflicts While Developing Relationships

Instructor: Jordan Cohen, MD*
Date: Thursday, October 11, 2012
Length: 1 hour

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Objectives for this session:

  1. Provide attendees a better understanding of how to manage potential conflicts of interest that may arise when collaborating with industry
  2. Review the various conflicts that may arise within the practice of medicine
  3. Learn about the Physician Payment Sunshine Act which will require pharmaceutical and medical device companies to report payments made to doctors and teaching hospitals.

Harassment: What Is It and How Do We Prevent It?

Instructor: Sidney Steinberg*
Date: February 13, 2012
Length: 1 hour

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Objectives for this session:

  1. What is harassment?
  2. What is NOT harassment?
  3. What are your responsibilities?
  4. What should you do if harassment comes to your attention?

Berkowitz Humanism in Medicine Lecture: Why do we make it so difficult to die well in American health care institutions?

Instructor: Art Caplan, PhD
Date: Tuesday, March 5, 2012
Length: 1 hour & 10 minutes

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Objectives for this session:

  1. Participants will learn about advanced directives and why don't they work very well?
  2. What is POLST and is that likely to work any better?
  3. For patients, what matters to them in terms of autonomy?
  4. Should doctors be more paternalistic and if so how can this be done ethically?
  5. Make clear who has decision making authority when patients cannot communicate or even when they can.

Philanthropy 101

Instructor: Elizabeth Dale, Executive Vice President for Institutional Advancement
Date: May 12, 2016
Length: 1 hour & 30 minutes

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This session is geared towards faculty members who want to learn more about philanthropy at Thomas Jefferson University (TJU). Participants will learn how to work with institutional advancement officers to engage donors and foundations to support their research and work.

Discussions will focus on foundations and endowments, and how philanthropic support could potentially intersect with faculty members' work at TJU. Participants will also learn how to effectively describe the potential impact and significance of their research to optimally leverage financial support of their work.

Following this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the importance of philanthropic and donor support in your research
  2. Identify available resources in Jefferson's Office of institutional Advancement
  3. Relate the impact of donor motivations and faculty participation in the philanthropic enterprise at Jefferson

My Road to the College Presidency

Instructor: Laura Schweitzer, PhD
Date: October 19, 2015
Length: 1 hour & 30 minutes

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This session is geared toward senior women faculty (i.e., Associate Professors, Full Professors). Stepping through her career from Assistant Professor to College President, Dr. Laura Schweitzer talks about lessons learned and skills acquired, and how those skills are cumulative and transferable to each new challenge. A theme of weathering change is interwoven into each career step. Building on the first session, Dr. Schweitzer will share lessons learned with regards to professional development and performance, as well as professional relationship building.

Following this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Recognize how basic skills acquired in laboratories, clinics, and classrooms are transferable to new challenges as your career progresses
  2. Participate in a guided, frank discussion of leadership challenges with your peers
  3. Assess their professional and academic development and decide on personal 'next steps'

Strategic Career Planning: Learning to Say NO While Preparing to Say YES

Instructor: Laura Schweitzer, PhD
Date: October 19, 2015
Length: 1 hour & 30 minutes

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This session is geared toward junior women faculty (and post-docs). Often junior faculty, (especially women) are asked to carry a large service load and while being good citizens, these loads can compromise their career progress and promotion and tenure success. The session challenges junior faculty to define a strategic direction for their career and to use that definition as a compass when considering whether to say yes or no to new obligations. In addition, time will be spent on bolstering professional development, increasing professional performance, and relationship building.

Following this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss the use of 'A History of Your Future' - a strategic career planning tool
  2. Relate the need to make conscious, intentional, and strategic decisions with regards to the career choices you face
  3. Acquire an understanding of how natural tendencies can undermine your career

Leveraging Emotional Intelligence in the Health Professions

Instructor: Dimitrios Papanagnou, MD, MPH, and Elizabeth Speakman, RN, EdD
Date: October 27, 2014
Length: 3 hours

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Emotional Intelligence (EQ) is of utmost importance in healthcare settings. Whether it's interacting with patients and their families, or working with interprofessional, multidisciplinary teams, emotional intelligence is essential for successful outcomes. Unfortunately, formalized training programs in emotional intelligence do not exist in the context of healthcare.

How can faculty apply EQ principles to the instruction of students enrolled in healthcare training programs and resident physicians in training? What EQ tools are available for faculty?

In this workshop, participants will have the chance to better understand their own EQ indices, and apply EQ to their work with students and residents. Speci c time will be spent on the core EQ components: self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, and relationship management.

Following this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Define emotional intelligence and identify key EQ concepts
  2. Discuss how improving emotional intelligence can improve teamwork, communication, professionalism, and patient care
  3. Review different instructional methods to teach emotional intelligence in trainees

Leveraging Social Intelligence in the Health Professions

Instructor: Rachel Ciproen, EdD
Date: October 27, 2014
Length: 3 hours

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How do you prefer to think? How do you communicate? How do you lead?

Everything we do starts with our brain - the way we think, react to others, make decisions, communicate, chose careers, and manage people. Sure, the brain is divided into two hemispheres: the left hemisphere controls our logical and rational thinking patterns, while the right hemisphere works with our creative and people-oriented thinking. But truth be told, there are more ways that describe the way we think and the way we see the world than the two hemispheres alone can explain. And we all have our preferred ways of thinking!

In this workshop, learners will better understand their thinking preferences. Dr. Ciporen will use active learning strategies and the NBI Brain Profile to explore learners' behaviors and adaptability. Based on research in psychology and neuroscience, the NBI will help learners engage in dialogue that will guide their understanding of the frameworks for thinking.

Following this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Define social intelligence and identify key SQ concepts
  2. Discuss how improving social intelligence can improve teamwork, communication, professionalism, and patient care
  3. Review different instructional methods to teach social intelligence in trainees

Technological Enhancement in the Learning Environment

Instructor: Anthony Frisby, PhD
Date: September 18, 2015
Length: 50 minutes

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Students coming to Jefferson have grown up during a period of incredible advances in information technologies. For them, there has always been an Internet, MP3 digital music, and streaming media. Most will have attended colleges where educational technologies provided a blended approach to learning-that is, where at least part of the classroom experience was replaced with online components. Jefferson's educational programs are also undergoing a significant change in the way they provide instruction as we move to a blended approach and flip what is considered homework and content delivery. This session will present several new educational technologies available at Jefferson to help you organize and deliver your instructional content and to engage our students in meaningful learning exercises in the classroom.

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe how the learning environment is changing to a student-focused experience and what implications this has for the way they teach
  2. Identify several different educational technologies available to them for use in the classroom and online
  3. Name educational technologies and the support structure at Jefferson (i.e., Where to go? Who to contact for help?)
  4. Refer students to the educational technologies support structure at Jefferson

Designing and Implementing Effective Learning Communities

Instructor: Ellen Goldman, EdD and Dimitrios Papanagnou, MD, MPH
Date: November 19, 2014
Length: 1 hour & 30 minutes

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Whether you provide healthcare in the clinic, the emergency department, or the ICU; whether you eat lunch in the cafeteria or in the office; whether you belong to a journal club or a book club; or whether you subscribe to a discussion board or a newsgroup - chances are that you already belong to a community of practice. It's even likely that you belong to multiple communities of practice.

The concept of a community of practice (CoP) is not a new phenomenon - this type of learning practice existed for as long as individuals have been learning and sharing their experiences through storytelling. Individuals that comprises a CoP can evolve and learn naturally because of a common interest in a particular domain (i.e., a profession), or the group can be created specifically with the goal of gaining knowledge related to a field.

Consider your professional medical society membership; that qualifies as a community of practice. Consider your professional memberships on-campus at Thomas Jefferson University (i.e., committees, councils, etc.); those, too, count as communities of practice. And within each community, there is learning that takes place.

So why do we subscribe ourselves to these communities? Why are communities of practice so vital to our pedagogy? And is there a way we can leverage communities of practice to foster learning in our students and trainees?

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe a community of practice
  2. Discuss the role of communities of practice in medical educational curricula
  3. Relate and critique an example of the application of a CoP learning model in a medical school curriculum
  4. Explore potential applications for communities of practice in healthcare education

Design for Engaged Learning

Instructor: Ellen Goldman, EdD
Date: November 19, 2014
Length: 1 hour & 45 minutes

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This workshop will help participants assimilate principles of adult learning and effective instructional design techniques as they integrate active learning into their courses. Participants will be provided with frameworks and resources to guide them through the design process, including a step-by-step class design framework, descriptions of 22 active learning techniques, and a reference list.

Materials presented can be applied to any course and used with any audience, so the applicability of this session extends to all areas of the health sciences. is session will also create the foundation to better understand, develop and implement effective learning communities (see session below).

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe how the learning environment is changing to a student-focused experience and what implications this has for the way they teach
  2. Identify the major components of effective learner-centered instructional design
  3. Recognize the power of active engagement of students in the learning process
  4. Reformulate a traditional teaching session with strategies for active engagement